Dupuytren’s Contracture Treatment at CMC Hospital in Dubai
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Hand and Wrist Surgery Trigger Finger/Thumb

Dupuytren’s Contracture Treatment in Dubai

Dupuytren’s contracture is a condition that affects the connective tissue in the hand, causing the fingers to bend towards the palm of the hand and making it difficult to straighten them. The condition is named after Baron Guillaume Dupuytren, a French surgeon who first described it in 1831.

Dupuytren’s contracture usually develops gradually over a period of several years. It typically affects the ring finger and little finger, although it can also affect other fingers. The condition is more common in men than in women, and it tends to develop in people over the age of 50.

 

Symptoms of Dupuytren’s Contracture

The symptoms of Dupuytren’s contracture include:

  • One or more fingers gradually bending towards the palm of the hand
  • Thickening and tightening of the skin on the palm of the hand
  • Small, hard nodules or lumps on the palm of the hand

As the condition progresses, it can become increasingly difficult to use the affected hand for everyday activities such as grasping and holding objects.

 

Causes of Dupuytren’s Contracture

The exact cause of Dupuytren’s contracture is unknown, but it is thought to be related to a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Certain factors, such as smoking and heavy drinking, may increase the risk of developing the condition.

Some potential causes of Dupuytren’s contracture include:

Genetic Factors: Dupuytren’s contracture tends to run in families, suggesting a genetic component to the condition. Several genetic mutations have been associated with an increased risk of developing Dupuytren’s contracture.

Age and Gender: The condition is more common in older adults, typically occurring after the age of 50. Additionally, it is more common in men than women.

Health Conditions: Some health conditions, such as diabetes, epilepsy, and alcoholism, have been associated with an increased risk of developing Dupuytren’s contracture.

Lifestyle Factors: Certain lifestyle factors, such as heavy smoking and drinking, have been linked to an increased risk of developing the condition.

Inflammation: There is evidence to suggest that chronic inflammation may play a role in the development of Dupuytren’s contracture.

It is important to note that while these factors may increase the risk of developing Dupuytren’s contracture, not everyone who has these risk factors will develop the condition. Additionally, the exact cause of the condition may vary from person to person, and more research is needed to fully understand the underlying causes of Dupuytren’s contracture.

 

Treatment

Treatment for Dupuytren’s contracture depends on the severity of the condition and the extent of the symptoms. In mild cases, no treatment may be necessary, and the condition may not progress any further. However, if the condition is causing significant discomfort or interfering with daily activities, treatment may be recommended.

Here are some common treatment options for Dupuytren’s contracture:

Steroid Injections: Steroid injections can help to reduce inflammation and swelling in the affected area, which can relieve symptoms and slow down the progression of the condition. These injections are typically given directly into the affected finger or palm.

Radiation Therapy: Radiation therapy may be used to slow down the progression of Dupuytren’s contracture. This involves exposing the affected hand to low doses of radiation, which can help to reduce the growth of the abnormal tissue.

Surgery: Surgery is usually only recommended in cases where the condition is significantly impacting daily activities or causing severe deformity. There are several surgical procedures that can be used to treat Dupuytren’s contracture, including:

  • Fasciectomy – This involves removing the thickened tissue in the affected area to allow the fingers to straighten.
  • Needle Aponeurotomy – This is a minimally invasive procedure that involves inserting a needle into the affected tissue and using it to cut the thickened bands of tissue.
  • Collagenase InjectionThis involves injecting a medication called collagenase into the affected area, which can help to break down the thickened tissue and allow the fingers to straighten.

Physical Therapy: Physical therapy may be recommended after surgery to help improve range of motion and strengthen the hand.

It’s important to note that there is no cure for Dupuytren’s contracture, and treatment may not be necessary in all cases.

 

Is Dupuytren’s Contracture Related to Trigger Finger?

Dupuytren’s contracture and trigger finger are two separate conditions that affect the hand, but they can be related in some cases.

Dupuytren’s contracture involves the thickening and tightening of the tissue in the palm of the hand, which can cause the fingers to bend towards the palm and make it difficult to straighten them. Trigger finger, on the other hand, involves a problem with the tendons in the fingers or thumb, causing them to catch or lock in a bent position.

In some cases, a person with Dupuytren’s contracture may also develop trigger finger. This is because the same tissue thickening that causes Dupuytren’s contracture can also affect the tendons in the fingers, causing them to catch or lock in place.

Additionally, both conditions are more common in older adults and may have a genetic component. So, while Dupuytren’s contracture and trigger finger are not directly related, they may occur together or share some underlying factors.

It’s important to note that the treatments for Dupuytren’s contracture and trigger finger are different, and a proper diagnosis from a healthcare provider is necessary to determine the best course of treatment for each individual condition.

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