Orbital Tumor Treatment in Dubai | Eye Socket Tumor
Appointment

Related Services

الخدمات ذات الصلة

Oculoplastic Surgery

Orbital Tumor Treatment in Dubai

Orbital tumors are tumors that occur in or around the eye socket, which is also known as the orbit. These tumors can be benign or malignant, and can affect any of the tissues or structures in the orbit, including the muscles, nerves, blood vessels, and connective tissue.

Diagnosis of orbital tumors may involve a comprehensive eye exam, imaging tests such as MRI or CT scans, and biopsy of the tumor tissue. The prognosis for orbital tumors depends on the type and stage of the tumor, as well as other individual factors such as age and overall health. In general, early detection and treatment can improve outcomes and reduce the risk of complications.

 

Orbital Tumor Symptoms

The symptoms of an orbital tumor can vary depending on the size, location, and type of tumor. Some common symptoms of an orbital tumor include:

Bulging or swelling of the eye: An orbital tumor can cause the eye to bulge or protrude from its normal position in the orbit.

Changes in vision: Vision changes or loss can occur due to the pressure that the tumor places on the optic nerve or other structures within the orbit.

Pain or discomfort: An orbital tumor can cause pain or discomfort around the eye or in the surrounding area.

Double vision: Double vision, also known as diplopia, can occur if the tumor affects the movement of the eye or the nerves that control eye movements.

Proptosis: Proptosis is the forward displacement of the eye from its normal position, and can be caused by an orbital tumor.

Redness or inflammation: An orbital tumor can cause redness or inflammation of the eye or surrounding tissue.

Numbness or tingling: Numbness or tingling in the area around the eye or face can occur if the tumor affects nerves in the region.

 

Orbital Tumor Causes

The causes of orbital tumors are not always clear, but some common risk factors that may contribute to their development include:

Genetics: Some orbital tumors may be inherited or caused by genetic mutations.

Age: The risk of developing an orbital tumor increases with age, and certain types of tumors are more common in older adults.

Exposure to radiation: Exposure to ionizing radiation, such as radiation therapy for other cancers, may increase the risk of developing an orbital tumor.

Environmental factors: Exposure to certain environmental toxins or pollutants may increase the risk of developing an orbital tumor.

Immune system disorders: Some immune system disorders, such as sarcoidosis or Wegener’s granulomatosis, may increase the risk of developing an orbital tumor.

Other medical conditions: Certain medical conditions, such as neurofibromatosis type 1, can increase the risk of developing an orbital tumor.

Unknown causes: In many cases, the exact cause of an orbital tumor is not known.

It is important to note that having one or more of these risk factors does not necessarily mean that a person will develop an orbital tumor.

 

Treatment Options for Orbital Tumor

Treatment options for orbital cancer depend on the type and stage of the cancer, as well as your overall health and preferences. Common treatment options for orbital cancer include:

Surgery: Surgery is often the primary treatment for orbital cancer. The goal of surgery is to remove as much of the cancer as possible, while preserving the eye and surrounding structures as much as possible.

Radiation therapy: Radiation therapy uses high-energy radiation to kill cancer cells. It may be used alone or in combination with surgery.

Chemotherapy: Chemotherapy uses drugs to kill cancer cells throughout the body. It may be used alone or in combination with other treatments for orbital cancer.

Immunotherapy: Immunotherapy uses drugs to stimulate the immune system to attack cancer cells. It is a newer type of treatment that may be used for certain types of orbital cancer.

Targeted therapy: Targeted therapy uses drugs that target specific molecules or proteins that are involved in the growth and spread of cancer cells. It may be used for certain types of orbital cancer that have specific genetic mutations.

Palliative care: Palliative care focuses on improving the quality of life for individuals with advanced or terminal cancer. It can involve pain management, symptom relief, and emotional and spiritual support.

 

Surgical Treatment for Orbital Tumor

The goal of surgery is to remove as much of the tumor as possible, while preserving the function of the eye and surrounding structures.

The specific surgical options for orbital tumor treatment depend on the type, location, and size of the tumor, as well as other individual factors.

Here are some common surgical options for orbital tumor treatment:

Biopsy: A biopsy may be performed to diagnose the type of tumor and determine the appropriate treatment. During a biopsy, a small sample of tissue is removed from the tumor for examination under a microscope.

Complete Tumor Removal: For small or localized tumors, complete removal may be possible. The surgeon may use an endoscope, which is a small camera and light on the end of a thin tube, to visualize the tumor and surrounding structures and remove the tumor through a small incision.

Partial Tumor Removal: For larger or more complex tumors, partial removal may be necessary to preserve the function of the eye and surrounding structures. This may involve removing part of the tumor and leaving the rest in place, or removing as much of the tumor as possible while preserving critical structures.

Reconstruction: After the tumor is removed, reconstruction may be necessary to restore the appearance and function of the eye and surrounding structures. This may involve using tissue grafts, synthetic materials, or other techniques to rebuild the orbital structure.

Start chat
1
Chat with us
Hello
I’d like to book an appointment