Antiphospholipid Syndrome - CMC
Appointment

Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) in the blood. These antibodies target phospholipids, which are essential components of cell membranes, and can lead to blood clots in veins or arteries, recurrent miscarriages and other complications. APS can occur as a primary disorder or in association with other autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).
Causes of antiphospholipid syndrome

The exact cause of APS is unknown, but it is thought to be an autoimmune disease, in which the body’s immune system mistakenly targets and attacks its own tissues. In APS, the immune system produces antibodies that target phospholipids, which are present in cell membranes and help regulate blood clotting. The presence of aPL antibodies in the blood can lead to the formation of blood clots, which can cause a range of health problems, including stroke, heart attack, deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism.
Diagnosis of Antiphospholipid Syndrome

The diagnosis of antiphospholipid syndrome is based on a combination of clinical features and laboratory tests. Symptoms may include blood clots in the veins or arteries, recurrent miscarriages, or other pregnancy complications such as pre-eclampsia or fetal growth restriction. Laboratory tests are used to confirm the presence of aPL antibodies in the blood. The most commonly used tests are the anti-cardiolipin antibody (aCL) test, the lupus anticoagulant (LA) test, and the anti-beta2 glycoprotein I (anti-B2GPI) test. These tests are usually performed twice, at least 12 weeks apart, to confirm the diagnosis.

Treatment of antiphospholipid syndrome

The treatment of antiphospholipid syndrome depends on the symptoms and complications of the disease. The main goals of treatment are to prevent blood clots from forming, to reduce the risk of pregnancy complications and to manage any other symptoms. Anticoagulant therapy, such as warfarin or heparin, is most commonly used to prevent blood clots. In some cases, aspirin may also be prescribed to reduce the risk of blood clots. People with PPS who have a history of recurrent miscarriage or other pregnancy complications may be treated with low-dose aspirin and/or heparin during pregnancy to reduce the risk of complications.

Other treatment options for SAPL may include immunosuppressive therapy, such as corticosteroids, if the disease is associated with another autoimmune disorder, such as SLE. In addition, lifestyle changes, such as regular exercise, maintaining a healthy weight and not smoking, can also help reduce the risk of blood clots and improve overall health.

In conclusion, PAS is an autoimmune disease that can lead to a range of health problems, including blood clots, recurrent miscarriages and pregnancy complications. Diagnosis is based on a combination of clinical features and laboratory tests, and treatment depends on the individual’s symptoms and complications. Anticoagulant therapy is the most common treatment used to prevent blood clots, while low-dose aspirin and/or heparin can be used during pregnancy to reduce the risk of complications. Lifestyle changes can also help reduce the risk of blood clots and improve overall health.

 

 

Start chat
1
Chat with us
Hello
I’d like to book an appointment